Living and thriving through regenerative practices and a sustainable worldview.

Food

Holistic Management International – Free Resources to Help You Grow

This is a great website with some good free downloads.
Check it.

http://holisticmanagement.org/free-downloads/

HMI is proud to offer a series of packages for our practitioners, students, and supporters. We offer four free download packages: Introduction to Holistic Management, Holistic Financial Planning, Holistic Grazing Planning, and Kids on the Land. Each download packet comes with a Readme inventory file that details the contents and applications of each document. Details on each packet are provided below.

1. Introduction to Holistic Management: This package contains our 130 page Introduction to Holistic Management Manual, a special edition of HMI’s bi-monthly newsletter In Practice, the case study publication A New Environmental Intelligence, a full-sized full color version of the Holistic Management decision model, and a pocket-sized version of the Holistic Management decision model.

2. Holistic Financial Planning: This package contains our 59 page Holistic Financial Planning Manual, a financial planning worksheet, a large-sized annual income and expense worksheet, and a financial monitoring control sheet.

3. Holistic Grazing Planning: This package contains our Holistic Management Grazing Planning Manual, an electronic version of the holistic grazing planning worksheet, a livestock production worksheet, and the Holistic Weed Management worksheet.

4. Kids on the Land: This package includes our 8 page Guide to Starting Kids on the Land and six separate how-to manuals for conducting a Kids on the Land programs. These six manuals are designed by grade-level. The first begins with Kindergarten and they progress sequentially to Grade 5.


Homemade Bottom Heat for Seed Starting!

Let’s face it – Burning Man and Christmas only come once a year.
So what to do with the plethora of rope lights sitting in your attic or closet for the rest of the year?
Here’s an awesome tutorial for just that!

http://doorgarden.com/02/home-made-bottom-heat-seed-starting

 
 

Seed Starting Chart

A handy chart for knowing when to plant :

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/seed-starting-chart


Some Mid-Atlantic wild edibles…

Wild Edibles Common to Philadelphia Area
by Lynn Landes, organizer of Wild Foodies of Philly – wild edibles enthusiast, not expert!

http://www.learnstuff.us/CommonWildEdibles.htm


IDEP's Companion Planting Guide (Permaculture Perspective)

IDEP’s Companion Planting Guide - This chart lists companion plants from a permaculture perspective, and includes things like “antagonistic” or “companion”, and also insect repellant tendancies.

Click here for full PDF


USDA Plant Hardiness Map – 2012

Seed catalogs are out, and garden-planning season is abound!
While crazy weather has been the norm lately, it’s still a good idea to plan for seasonal conditions, at least for now. ;)

USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map  – 2012

 


Wisdom and Know-How Books!

Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers has a great series of large, everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about “X” books.

Check them out here.


Process Books: Self-Reliance series

I have not read any of these, but they look like an interesting series of books. The Preparedness Now! series looks like it has a lot of basic homesteading skills wrapped up for urban and suburban-ites, and others who may not be familiar with the topic. Will have to check it out.
http://processmediainc.com/store/books/selfreliance/

Depression 2.0

Creative Strategies for Tough Economic Times

Cletus Nelson

Depression 2.0 is a practical, empowering, hands-on guide to persevering and even thriving in the event of an economic crisis. Placing particular emphasis on self-sufficiency, community-building, and personal resilience, this timely, informative book offers a hopeful way forward in a time of great uncertainty. Bankruptcy, barter, and survival investing are just a few of the important topics explored.

Getting Out

Getting Out

Your Guide to Leaving America

by Mark Ehrman

View the Getting Out website.

Getting Out walks you through the world of the expat: the reasons, the rules, the resources, the tricks of the trade, along with compelling stories and expertise from expatriate Americans on every continent.

The Natural Kitchen

Your Guide to the Sustainable Food Revolution

Deborah Eden Tull

A simple, revolutionary guide to mindful, sustainable food shopping, planning, preparation, cooking, and eating in the city.

Preparedness Now!

An Emergency Survival Guide
Expanded and Revised Edition

By Aton Edwards

View the Preparedness Now! website

PREPAREDNESS NOW! is the first comprehensive planning and action guide for urbanites and suburbanites who want to live more self-sufficiently and learn how best to provide for themselves and their loved ones in the face of any emergency or disaster. “Aton’s work is tremendously important. What we need to do for the next round is to get ourselves prepared.” — Chuck D., author, musician, and host of “On the Real”

The Urban Homestead

Self-Sufficient Living in the City (Expanded and Revised Edition)

By Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen

This celebrated, essential handbook for the urban homesteading movement shows how to grow and preserve your own food, clean your house without toxins, raise chickens, gain energy independence, and more. Step-by-step projects, tips, and anecdotes will help get you started…

When There Is No Doctor

Preventive and Emergency Healthcare in Uncertain Times

By Gerard S. Doyle, MD

The fifth title in Process’ Self-Reliance series demystifies medical practices with a practical approach to 21st Century health and home medicine, particularly helpful for stressful moments in a financial downturn. When There Is No Doctor is smartly designed and full…


Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables

From:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/extension/newsletters/vpmnews/apr02/art4apr.html

This article by M. J. Stephens, University of Florida, Department of Horticulture, appeared in “Vegetarian,” 98-05.

The culinary reputation of most vegetables is based primarily on the edible qualities of one or sometimes two primary parts of the plant. For example, the tomato is the leading garden vegetable, due to the popular appeal of its fruit, while the turnip contributes both its root and its leaves as table fare. For home gardeners who grow and have the entire vegetable plant at their disposal, other plant parts may be edible, although perhaps not so tasty as the main product. For non-gardeners, however, there is little option for eating parts other than those offered for sale.

The following is a list of ordinary garden vegetables with both commonly-eaten parts and less-frequently eaten parts. Obviously, in a list such as this, there may be quite a few omissions.

Although many of the secondary plant parts are edible, their popularity as food items is diminished by lack of proper flavor or unfavorable texture. For example, the leaves of practically all the cabbage family are edible, but the strong flavors of some species are disagreeable or too strong for most people’s taste.

The edible leaves and stem tips of sweet potato vines are well known in many parts of the world. Often considered a poor man’s food, sweet potato foliage has a rich protein content that helps supplement the nutritional value of the roots.

As for all vegetable parts, there is a great deal of variation within varieties in flavor and culinary characteristics of these secondary parts. For example, some sweet-potato stem tips in certain varieties are bitter, with a resinous flavor that is too strong.

Quite often, cooking is necessary to make the parts edible. Raw leaves eaten fresh may even be slightly poisonous in some cases.

Vegetable Common Edible Parts Other Edible Parts
Beans, snap pod with seeds leaves
Beans, lima seeds pods, leaves
Beets root leaves
Broccoli flower leaves, flower stem
Carrot root leaves
Cauliflower immature flower flower stem, leaves
Celery leaf stems leaves, seeds
Corn, sweet seeds young ears, unfurled tassel, young leaves
Cucumber fruit with seeds stem tips and young leaves
Eggplant fruit with seeds leaves edible but not flavorful
Kohlrabi swollen stem leaves
Okra pods with seeds leaves
Onions root young leaves
Parsley tops roots
Peas, English seeds pods, leaves
Peas, Southern seeds, pods young leaves
Pepper pods leaves after cooking, immature seeds
Potatoes, Sweet roots leaves and stem shoots
Radish roots leaves
Squash fruit with seeds seeds, flowers, young leaves
Tomato fruits with seeds leaves contain alkaloids
Turnip roots, leaves ———-
Watermelon fruit — interior pulp and seeds rind of fruit

Hamburg Parsley Turnip – Versatile and yummy!

http://eatdrinkbetter.com/2008/10/23/its-a-parsnip-its-a-carrot-no-its-parsley-root/

It’s a Parsnip, it’s a Carrot – No, it’s Parsley Root

October 23, 2008 By

Parsley RootMy choice for this weeks unusual vegetable is Parsley Root (Petroselinum crispum variety tuberosum), also known as Rooted parsley, Turnip-Rooted Parsley, Dutch Parsley, Hamburg Parsley or Heimischer. It’s a winter root that has been used for centuries for soups and stews in the “Old World” but is fairly unknown and underutilized everywhere else – at least in the culinary community.

Parsley root extract has been shown to be useful for chronic liver and gallbladder diseases. It is a diuretic, blood purifier, carminative, and hepatic.

The parsnip-like root is white, dry and has a flavor somewhat like celery, turnips, and, of course, parsley. It’s usually available August through April, being at it’s peak in November through February. Use it like you would a parsnip, carrot, celery root or turnip. Think aromatic, a little aggressive, herbal and pungent.

It pairs beautifully with other roots in dishes like:

Caramelized Assorted Root Vegetables
Roasting vegetables is an age-old technique that releases natural sugars. By combining several vegetables and cooking them slowly until they are caramelized and sweet, I take that method one step further and achieve an enticing medley of flavors and textures. You could serve these humble root vegetables alone or with almost any roasted meat, game or poultry. Add a salad of tossed greens to your menu to round out the meal. The recipe can be doubled or tripled if necessary, but divide the mixture between several pans so the cooking process is not affected.

For the Roasted Root Vegetables
4 ounces pearl onions
1 head garlic
4 carrots
2 parsnips
2 turnips
2 parsley roots
2 Yukon Gold, 6 fingerling or other waxy potatoes
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive, plus more if needed
kosher salt and cracked black pepper, to taste

To Prepare the Roasted Root Vegetables: Preheat oven to 350ºF.

Fill a medium-sized saucepan two-thirds full with water and set over high heat. Bring water to a boil. Add onions and boil one minute or slightly longer to loosen skins. Remove onions with a slotted spoon and let cool. When onions are cool enough to handle, use a paring knife to loosen skins, then slip off the skins and discard. Set onions aside.

Separate the head of garlic into cloves and lightly smash each clove using the side of a large knife to loosen the skin. Remove the skin and set garlic cloves aside. Peel carrots, parsnips, and parsley root then cut into pieces about 2-inches long. Peel turnips and potatoes, halve lengthwise, then cut each half into 1-inch thick slices. Set all vegetables aside.

In a large, heavy roasting pan or in a large, ovenproof sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until almost smoking. Add the vegetables and sauté, stirring, for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from heat and season vegetables with salt and pepper.

Transfer pan with vegetables to oven. Roast, stirring every 5 minutes, until vegetables are lightly browned and tender when pierced with a knife, 30 to 35 minutes. If the vegetables start to stick to the bottom of the pan while roasting, add 1 to 2 tablespoons additional oil and toss again.

Remove pan from oven and taste and adjust seasoning.

Advance Preparation: These vegetables are best served immediately after they come out of the oven, but if you prefer, you can roast them ahead and reheat them just before serving.

Substitutions and Options: Any root vegetables will work; you may omit or add vegetables to suite your tastes and what is available in the market.

Makes 4 side dish servings