Living and thriving through regenerative practices and a sustainable worldview.

Transitioning through the seasons and pattern recognition

This post is chock-full of stuff, so be forewarned!

I don’t know about you, but this year I’ve been a little “ahead” of the seasons. Maybe it’s the crazy weather, or maybe it’s just the “hurry-up” pace of work, life, technology, etc.
Whatever the reason, I found myself fantasizing about Halloween and apple cider early last month, and although my kale hasn’t even fully invaded my garden yet, I am now looking forward to curling up in layers of blankets and socks, and hibernating with a cup of hot cocoa as snow falls silently outside.
Perhaps I just need a good crisp day of hiking in the autumn foliage to set me right.
With that said, it seems serendipity stuck her foot out and I tripped over this wonderful diagram of the Seasons of Transition.
(click the image to view a larger version)

Diagram of Seasons

Diagram of Seasons

Diagram of Seasons

This diagram actually reminds me a LOT of the 8 Shields model, which allows you to “map many of the phases and relationships occurring in nature, both on a grand scale, and also within the nuances of human learning and culture.”

This includes phases of the day, physical needs, seasons, lifespan, etc. It is an EXCELLENT and very flexible tool for permaculturists who want to map patterns in nature, behavior, and really, just about anything.

 

 

 

 

The Eight Shields Model:

I’ve used it myself as a guide for mapping the relationships between generational tendencies and Euro-American history, based on the work of Howe & Strauss.  I’ve also used it as an attempt to map our own sentient thought processes and behavior based on the work of David Bohm.
So, as you can tell from the applications, this model is a pretty powerful, useful tool.

8 Handshakes

8 Handshakes

Pattern recognition is a VERY important skill in itself, and there have been tons of really great articles written on its uses in self-sufficiency, the economy, etc.

I would also like to take a moment here to give credit where credit is due. It is my educated guess that all of these models are probably derivative of the Native American use of the “Four Directions”, or “Medicine Wheel”:

Other ancient indigenous cultures used similar models:

Medicine Wheel

Medicine Wheel

YungDrung Bon

YungDrung Bon

 

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